Bronze Memorial Plaque

The Bronze Memorial Plaque Program offers the opportunity to permanently honor deceased members of the Armed Forces, their friends and family, and the fallen heroes of current conflicts by placing their name on a bronze plaque that is located at the U.S. Army Women’s Museum at Fort Lee, Virginia.

Close up of Bronze Memorial Plaque #3 — 2003–2004

The cost to include a name on a plaque is $100. Donations in any amount are welcome, and will be held until the amount required for the individual minimum amount is reached. The Army Women’s Foundation ensures that all women soldiers killed in a war zone are included in the Fallen Heroes sections of the plaques at the Foundation’s expense.

The program began with the dedication of the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) Museum at Fort McClellan, Ala., in 1977.

When Fort McClellan closed in 1999 the contents of the Museum were moved to Fort Lee, Va. The U.S. Army Women’s Museum was dedicated in May 2001 with a new mission: to represent the service of women across all elements of the U.S. Army from inception to the present day.

Nine memorial plaques were moved with other museum artifacts to Fort Lee; an additional six have been dedicated since. Each plaque lists names of friends, family or colleagues.

The fifteen plaques in place at the Army Women’s Museum memorialize over 2,700 individuals. The persons included on the plaques are a diverse group. Most people who are listed on the plaques served in the Army, but other services are also represented, as are civilian family members, friends and supporters. A handful are well known, but most are not.

General George C. Marshall, Army Chief of Staff, was instrumental in the creation of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) and the WAC; he is on Plaque II.

Colonel Oveta Culp Hobby, the first WAAC/WAC director, is on Plaque VIII; she served as the first Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare under President Eisenhower. She was the owner of the Houston Post newspaper.

Comedian Bob Hope is listed on Plaque XII. A staunch supporter of the military, he was noted for his trips to remote areas and war zones around the world to entertain troops from World War II through Gulf War I.

Army women who died in incidents such as the Gander, Newfoundland plane crash in 1985 (III), Gulf War I (VI), and in the explosion at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City (VIII) are remembered on the plaques indicated in parenthesis.

The memorial program is a permanent and visible commitment to the memory of our friends, family and comrades.

View a complete list of names on Plaque I.

View a complete list of names on Plaque II.

View a complete list of names on Plaque III.

View a complete list of names on Plaque IV.

View a complete list of names on Plaque V.

View a complete list of names on Plaque VI.

View a complete list of names on Plaque VII.

View a complete list of names on Plaque VIII.

View a complete list of names on Plaque IX.

View a complete list of names on Plaque X.

View a complete list of names on Plaque XI.

View a complete list of names on Plaque XII.

View a complete list of names on Plaque XIII.

View a complete list of names on Plaque XIV.

View a complete list of names on Plaque XV.

View a pamphlet that includes a complete list of names on Plaque XIII (January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2006) and selected biographical sketches.